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1 Home
2 Advice
2.1   About You
2.1.1     Mobility
2.1.2     Hand Control
2.1.3     Memory
2.1.4     Body Shape
2.1.5     Eyesight
2.1.6     Day or Night
2.1.7     Lifestyle
2.1.8     Laundry
2.1.9     Storage and Disposal
2.1.10     Travel
2.1.11     Independence
2.1.12     Obtaining Products
2.1.13     Personal Preferences
2.1.14     Sex
2.2   Bladder Leakage
2.2.1     Amount
2.2.1.1       Pad Weighing
2.2.1.2       Guideline Estimate
2.2.1.3       Other Estimate
2.2.2     Frequency
2.2.2.1       Recording leakage
2.2.3     Types
2.2.3.1       Urge
2.2.3.2       Stress
2.2.3.3       Mixed
2.2.3.4       Women
2.2.3.5       Men
2.2.4     Product choice
2.3   Bowel Leakage
2.3.1     Amount
2.3.2     Frequency
2.3.2.1       Recording
2.4   Bladder and Bowel Leakage
2.5   Toileting Difficulties
2.6   Urinary Retention
2.7   Assessing your needs
2.8.1     Prostate Cancer
2.8.1.1       Surgery and a Catheter
2.8.1.1.1         Bladder Leakage Preparation
2.8.1.1.1.1           Continence Products
2.8.1.1.1.2           Pelvic Floor Muscle Training
2.8.1.1.1.3           Diet & Lifestyle
2.8.1.1.2         Your Catheter
2.8.1.1.2.1           In Hospital
2.8.1.1.2.2           At Home
2.8.1.1.3         Catheter Removal
2.8.1.1.3.1           During the Appointment
2.8.1.1.3.2           Returning Home
2.8.1.1.4         Coping with Bladder Leakage
2.8.1.1.4.2           More than 12 Months
2.8.1.2       Bladder / Bowel Leakage
2.8.1.2.1         Less than 12 Months
2.8.1.2.2         More than 12 Months
2.8.1.2.3         Pelvic Floor Muscle Training
2.8.1.2.4         Diet & Lifestyle
2.8.1.2.5         Non-Surgical Treatments
3 Products
3.1   Pads
3.1.1     Light bladder leakage in women
3.1.1.1       Disposable Pads
3.1.1.2       Washable Pads
3.1.1.3       Sanitary Towels
3.1.1.4       Washable Pants 14 
3.1.1.5       Small Disposable Pants
3.1.2     Moderate / heavy bladder leakage in women
3.1.2.1       Large Disposable Pants 10 
3.1.2.2       Disposable Pads
3.1.2.3       All-in-Ones
3.1.2.4       Washable Pads 14  12 
3.1.2.5       T-Shape Pads
3.1.3     Light bladder leakage in men
3.1.3.1       Disposable Pads
3.1.3.2       Disposable Pouches
3.1.3.3       Disposable Leafs
3.1.3.4       Washable Leafs
3.1.3.5       Washable Pads
3.1.3.6       Washable Pants 13 
3.1.3.7       Disposable Pants
3.1.4     Moderate / heavy bladder leakage in men 11 
3.1.4.1       Disposable Pads
3.1.4.2       All-in-Ones 12 
3.1.4.3       Large Disposable Pants 12 
3.1.4.4       Washable Pads 26  13 
3.1.4.5       T-Shape Pads
3.2   Female Devices
3.2.1     External Urethral Devices
3.2.2     Internal Urethral Devices
3.2.3     Internal Vaginal Devices
3.3   Male Devices
3.3.1     Sheaths 36  20 
3.3.2     Penile Compression Devices 28 
3.3.3     Body-Worn Urinals 22 
3.3.4     Devices for penile retraction 14 
3.4   Catheters
3.4.1     Intermittent Catheters 10  15 
3.4.1.1       Cleaning Methods
3.4.2     Indwelling Catheters 13 
3.4.3     Accessories 19 
3.5   Urine Drainage Bags
3.5.1     Leg Bags
3.5.1.1       Volume and Capacity
3.5.1.2       Sterile and Non-sterile
3.5.1.3       Drainage Taps
3.5.1.4       Sampling Ports
3.5.1.5       Discreetness
3.5.1.6       Positioning
3.5.1.7       Materials
3.5.1.8       Infection Control
3.5.1.9       Anti Kinking
3.5.2     Large Capacity
3.5.3     Straps and Support Garments
3.6   Faecal Devices
3.6.1     Anal Plugs
3.6.2     Faecal Pads
3.6.3     Faecal Collectors
3.7   Toileting Aids
3.7.1     Handheld Urinals
3.7.1.1       Female Handheld Urinals 20 
3.7.1.2       Male Handheld Urinals
3.7.2     Bedpans
3.7.3     Bidets
3.7.4     Bottom Wipers
3.7.5     Urine Directors
3.7.5.1       Female Urine Directors
3.7.5.2       Male Urine Directors
3.7.6     Toilet Raisers
3.7.7     Commodes
3.8   Bed, Chair Protectors
3.8.1     Washable Underpads
3.8.2     Disposable Underpads
3.8.3     Chair Protectors
3.8.4     Waterproof Bedding
3.9   Clothing, odour control and skin care
3.9.1     Clothing
3.9.2     Odour Control
3.9.3     Skin Care
4 Worldwide
5 Reference
5.1   Evidence
5.2   Glossary
5.3   Images
5.4   Documents
5.5   Tips
5.6   Sitemap
6 About
7 Contact

Continence Product Advisor

Incontinence can often be cured. Incontinence is a problem with one or more underlying causes that can often be cured or improved. Whatever your age seeking help is always advisable. Take the first step to getting help by contacting a health professional or continence organisation in your country.

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